Recursos sobre Diseño Universal para el Aprendizaje del Ministerio de Educación de los Estados Unidos

Página del Ministerio de Educación de los Estados Unidos donde se proporcionan enlaces a todos los recursos y herramientas para la educación sobre Diseño Universal para el Aprendizaje que han sido financiados o co-financiados con fondos públicos.

Enlace:
http://www.osepideasthatwork.org/udl/index.asp

Providing New Access to the General Curriculum: Universal Design for Learning

This article examines what is meant by access, participation, and progress in the regular education curriculum and suggests a new framework for curriculum reform that holds promise for all students, particularly students with disabilities. The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is presented and materials and methods of UDL are described. (Contains references.) (CR)

Referencia:
Hitchcock, C., Meyer, A., Rose, D. & Jackson, R. (2002). Providing New Access to the General Curriculum: Universal Design for Learning. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 35(2), 8-17.
Enlace:
http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&D=eric3&AN=EJ655577

Gaining Access to General Education: The Promise of Universal Design for Learning

On November 29, 1975 then President Ford signed the “Education of All Handicapped Children Act” (EAHCA) into law, mandating for the first time that children and youth with disabilities be afforded the right to a free and appropriate public education, individualized programming, parental participation in the decision making process, nondiscriminatory identification and evaluation, instruction in the least restrictive environment, while ensuring families due process rights and responsibilities. One challenge has been ensuring adequate access to the general education curriculum for an increasingly diverse group of learners within general education classrooms. One approach to making general education curriculum more accessible to diverse learners regardless of ability, learning style, language, or culture is the application of Universal Design for Learning (UDL). Grounded in research of learner differences, the capacities of new media, and the most effective teaching practices and assessments, UDL provides a framework for creating more robust learning opportunities for everyone. By using a UDL approach in the classroom, teachers design their instruction to meet the needs of a diverse group of learners rather than make ongoing adjustments for individual students with special needs. Highlighting the importance of UDL as a fundamental instructional approach has the potential to benefit students and teachers in both general and special education programs. In this article, the authors review the historical background regarding the movement toward greater access for students with special learning needs, the development of UDL as a method for providing access, and discuss supporting the implementation of UDL within school sites and institutions of higher education. (Contains 1 note and 2 tables.) (ERIC)

Referencia:
Jimenez, T. C., Graf, V. L. & Rose, E. (2007). Gaining Access to General Education: The Promise of Universal Design for Learning. Issues in Teacher Education, 16(2), 41-54.
Enlace:
http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&D=eric3&AN=EJ796250

A phenomenological, hermeneutic case study of two studio learning environments: Reggio Emilia pre-school atelier and MIT TEAL freshmen studio physics

This qualitative, phenomenological, hermeneutic case study explores two studio learning environments: the Reggio Emilia inspired Atelier of School within School, at Peabody Elementary, Washington, DC and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Freshmen Studio Physics, Technology Enabled Active Learning (TEAL). This study focuses on understanding processes through which learning takes place in two distinct studio learning environments, through observation of the instructional, attitudinal and architectural aspects of these classrooms and what occurs in them. The study uses a confluence of theories producing a multi-faceted conceptual lens through which data is viewed for understanding. This lens includes: the Theory of Multiple Intelligences, the Ethic of Care, Universal Design for Learning and Studio Habits of Mind. The goal of the study was to create a rich description of each particular case in order to identify the structures and processes inherent in the respective models and their implications for learning, as well as their potential as learning environments for students with disabilities and “at-risk” students. This case study relied primarily on three sources of data: (a) observation, (b) interviews and (c) artifacts. Triangulation and analysis of data resulted in rich descriptive narrative of the two studios. The results of this study defined Atelier (studio) at School within School through four major emergent themes (a) student-centered learning, (b) community, (c) multiple ways of knowing, (d) comfort and care. The study defined the TEAL studio at MIT through five major emergent themes: (a) student-centered learning, (b) multiple ways of knowing, (c) collaboration and community, (d) comfort and care, (e) teacher dispositions. A blended model of the cases concludes that studio, (a) offers student-driven hands-on active learning, (b) breaks down barriers between teachers and students, (c) is conducive to the development of caring peer relationships, (d) removes hierarchy and competition, (e) empowers students towards proficiency in the use of tools for learning, (f) offers multiple modalities for teaching and learning, (g) provides ongoing feedback and assessment, (h) learning is transparent and open-ended. This qualitative phenomenological, hermeneutic case study adds to the body of literature on studio settings as learning spaces and provides a platform for further research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

Referencia:
Magee, C. M. (2009). A phenomenological, hermeneutic case study of two studio learning environments: Reggio Emilia pre-school atelier and MIT TEAL freshmen studio physics.
Enlace:
http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&D=psyc&AN=2009-99231-304

“A Dance with the Butterflies:” A Metamorphosis of Teaching and Learning through Technology

This paper describes a web-based collaborative project called “A Dance with the Butterflies” that applied the brain-based research of the Center for Applied Special Technologies (CAST) and principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to Pre-K-4 science curriculum. Learning experiences were designed for students to invoke the Recognition, Strategic, and Affective neural networks for learning identified in the CAST research. Instruction was based on the Science Education content standard that all students should develop an understanding of the characteristics, life cycles, and environments of living organisms. Teachers designed interdisciplinary projects for students with the metamorphosis of the butterfly as the theme the unit. Participants from nine states and four countries learned about UDL to transform teaching and to collaborate through a blog that supported their learning. They shared new technology applications for use in their projects. The learning that occurred and the excitement to use technology for learning clearly demonstrate the power of the UDL framework for increasing engagement and understanding by all learners. (As Provided)

Referencia:
McPherson, S. (2009). “A Dance with the Butterflies:” A Metamorphosis of Teaching and Learning through Technology. Early Childhood Education Journal, 37(3), 229-236.

Transforming Universal Design for Learning in Early Childhood Teacher Education from College Classroom to Early Childhood Classroom

This article focuses on the application of Universal Design for Learning from theory to practice from the college classroom to the practicum experiences of preservice teacher candidates. It combines description of two research projects that explored and documented how participants understand and use Universal Design for Learning in lesson planning. Universal Design for Learning holds promise in training early childhood teacher educators to work with diverse populations and to provide access to learning for all students, including children with special needs. In Study One, 36 teacher candidates used action research to implement a Universal Design for Learning strategy, collect and analyze data, and become researchers. In Study Two, five teacher candidates were introduced to the principles of Universal Design for Learning and designed lesson plans for their practica. These qualitative research studies explored and documented how teacher candidates understand, introduce, and integrate the principles and practices of Universal Design for Learning. An overview of principles and practices of Universal Design for Learning, its use in the college classroom, its application in lesson planning and teaching, and the use of action research to determine its impact on the learning of all students in public school classrooms are presented. (As Provided)

Referencia:
McGuire-Schwartz, M. E. A., J. S. (2007). Transforming Universal Design for Learning in Early Childhood Teacher Education from College Classroom to Early Childhood Classroom. Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education, 28(2), 127-139.
Enlace:
http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&D=eric3&AN=EJ828432

Universal Design and Its Applications in Educational Environments

Universal design (UD), a concept from the field of architecture, is increasingly evident in discussions of approaches to enhance educational access for students with disabilities. Several emerging models of educational applications of UD–Universal Design for Learning, Universal Design for Instruction, and Universal Instructional Design–are discussed, with a call to the field for a collaborative approach to examine the efficacy of applications of UD to educational environments. Several critical areas for a research agenda are articulated, with caveats that the promise of UD for enhancing access not be undermined because of premature promotion of the concept before its validity is thoroughly examined. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract).

Referencia:
McGuire, J. M., Sally S. & Shaw, S. F. (2006). Universal Design and Its Applications in Educational Environments. Remedial and Special Education, 27(3), 166-175.
Enlace:
http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&D=psyc5&AN=2006-07299-005

Universal Design for Learning and Assistive Technology: Leadership Considerations for Promoting Inclusive Education in Today’s Secondary Schools

The increased number of students with learning disabilities in general education secondary school classrooms presents complex challenges for today’s educators. This article describes how the Universal Design for Learning theoretical framework can be used with assistive technology to enhance educational opportunities for secondary students with learning disabilities. Barriers that prevent secondary teachers from effectively selecting, adopting, implementing, and assessing assistive technology devices are discussed and potential solutions are identified. The article concludes with recommendations for enhancing secondary teachers’ professional development opportunities. (Contains 2 tables.) (As Provided)

Referencia:
Messinger-Willman, J. M., M. T. (2010). Universal Design for Learning and Assistive Technology: Leadership Considerations for Promoting Inclusive Education in Today’s Secondary Schools. NASSP Bulletin, 94(1), 5-16.
Enlace:
http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&D=eric3&AN=EJ894963

Perceptions of universal design for learning (UDL) in college classrooms

Universal design for learning (UDL) provides a framework for classroom instruction, which can have substantial impact on students’ interests and engagement. UDL is defined by research on diversity, brain-based research, multiple intelligences, and the flexibility digital media brings to the delivery of instruction (CAST, 2006; Rose & Meyer, 2002; Rose, Meyer, & Hitchcock, 2005). The central tenets of a UDL approach, guided by social learning (Bandura, 1986), cognitive learning theories (Bransford, Vye, Stevens, Kuhl, Schwartz, Bell, Meltzoff et al. 2006; Vygotsky, 1978), and research in the neurosciences (Bransford, Brown, & Cocking, 2000; Bransford, Vye, & Bateman, 2002; Goswami, 2004; Rose & Meyer, 2002) have potential to enhance learning for all students, especially in college classrooms. Today’s college student brings a plethora of technology skills and expectations that embrace many of the digital tools supportive of a UDL approach. The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to determine the relationship between use of UDL strategies and level of student interest and engagement in college classrooms at a public university in the Northeast and a private university in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Two online surveys were developed to ascertain student and faculty perceptions of UDL approaches and technologies used in classrooms, particularly those that aligned with the three UDL brain networks of recognition, strategic, and affective learning. Surveys also addressed levels of student interest and engagement. Surveys were used to collect data from 182 undergraduate and graduate students and nine faculty members. Responses from 27 student and faculty open-ended interviews were collected in the second phase. Findings from both phases of the study suggest that when faculty members use UDL strategies and technologies in their classes, there is a positive relationship to student interest and engagement. In the interview phase, predominant themes that emerged across three categories of classes (e.g., UDL implementers, some UDL users, and non-UDL users) for both students and faculty included use of (a) online access, (b) discussion groups, (c) ongoing feedback, (d) technology, and (e) multiple instructional approaches. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

Referencia:
Smith, F. G. (2008). Perceptions of universal design for learning (UDL) in college classrooms.
Enlace:
http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&D=psyc&AN=2008-99131-035